Seattle Education Association Collective Bargaining Agreement

Many families of special students have complained about the scarcity – or lack thereof – of offers for their children in the spring. This fall, the borough committed to personally serve special students if their needs could not be met remotely. However, the agreement provides that the borough will first have to complete a long list of health and safety safeguards before asking staff to meet personally with students. The week before the first day of school, September 4, staff will receive six days of training – twice as much as usual – which will focus primarily on how to teach and work effectively remotely and digitally, as well as anti-racist practices and social/emotional learning for students and families who have experienced the “common collective trauma of a dual pandemic”: Covid-19 and systemic racism. “Teams will verify the data to determine if the student needs personal services to make significant progress in their IEP goals and determine how to provide head services safely and in compliance with health policies,” the agreement says. The union is due to vote on the contract on Friday and details have not been made public, but a draft obtained by KUOW sets out more concrete expectations for employees and students than in the chaotic crisis mode of the spring, when the pandemic was new. The agreement would also allow schools and staff to be more flexible than the borough had previously suggested. Decisions about students who qualify for special education services are made by the students` Individualized Education Program team, as well as a school nurse or district health service staff member. The preliminary agreement is scheduled for a vote by the Seattle Education Association`s representatives` assembly on Friday night. It must then be approved by a vote of the school board. Unlike spring, teachers now have to participate by looking at things like students` daily online enrollment, communicating with students, or participating students in a task or task. When a student has an inexcusable absence, the teacher, attendance secretary or other school staff are expected to contact their families.

Secondary and secondary schools enjoy greater flexibility in teaching, but with much more structure than in the spring. The school day would be divided into three or four periods of classes that students would attend on Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays, according to an alternating A/B schedule. Teachers should organise at least two live online courses during the week for each teaching period and, if not, assign work in small groups or as a freelancer. On Wednesdays, secondary and secondary school teachers would allow at least 35 minutes to connect with students online and help their social/emotional needs, as well as extra time to provide live and small group classes and connect with families. . . .